Doughnut Chart

Doughnut charts present proportions of a whole through slices of a doughnut shaped graphic It is just a pie chart with the center missing. This type of chart can contain multiple series, represented as doughnuts arranged inside one another.

Sosulski, Kristen. Data Visualization Made Simple (p. 50). Taylor and Francis. Kindle Edition.

Stacked Area Chart

Stacked area charts highlight the absolute and relative differences between two or more series. They are line charts with the area below the line filled in with color. To show relative differences use a 100% stacked area chart. Label each series directly, if possible over using a legend.

Sosulski, Kristen. Data Visualization Made Simple (p. 50). Taylor and Francis. Kindle Edition.

Stacked Bar Chart

Stacked bar charts show proportions and quantities within a whole category. They show absolute and relative differences.

• Limit the number of subcategories to four or less.

• Use stacked bars that add up to 100% to show the relative differences between quantities within each group.

Sosulski, Kristen. Data Visualization Made Simple (p. 50). Taylor and Francis. Kindle Edition.

Sankey Chart

The core idea was to illustrate how impressions across multiple devices can be attributed to a user’s conversion…

Sosulski, Kristen. Data Visualization Made Simple (p. 39). Taylor and Francis. Kindle Edition.

Tree Map

Tree maps show parts of the whole by using nested rectangles. Each rectangle is designated a size and a shade of a color. This enables you to emphasize both the importance (usually shown by size) and urgency (usually represented by color) of a data point.

• Used often for portfolio analysis to highlight similarities and anomalies.

• Usually require interactivity such as mouse-over, to read the subcategory labels for the smallest rectangles.

• This chart type is best used for analysis and exploration rather than presentation.

Sosulski, Kristen. Data Visualization Made Simple (p. 50). Taylor and Francis. Kindle Edition.